<![CDATA[Miss Lady Bug's Garden - Yes You Can]]>Sun, 14 May 2017 15:53:09 -0700Weebly<![CDATA[Seafood Cocktail Sauce Recipe]]>Wed, 12 Aug 2015 21:11:38 GMThttp://missladybugsgarden.com/yes-you-can/seafood-cocktail-sauce-recipe Make your own seafood cocktail sauce at home. This recipe makes a fabulous sauce that pairs well with just about any seafood.

It's simple to make and oh so delicious. Ya'll will love it!
Seafood Cocktail Sauce
Yields approximately 4 pints 

Ingredients:

  • 7 cups tomato puree, organic
  • 1 lemon, juice and zest
  • 1 large garlic clove, finely chopped
  • 3/4 cup of brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon of Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 cups prepared horseradish

Directions:

  • Bring half of the tomato puree to a boil in a large stainless steel saucepan. While boiling, add the remaining puree. Reduce heat and simmer until the mixture reduces down by approximately half, about 20-25 minutes. Stir in all the ingredients except the horseradish. Bring mixture back to a boil. Boil for two to three minutes, routinely stirring. Remove from heat and add the horseradish. If you like a milder sauce, use half of the horseradish, then add to taste.
  • Pack into hot sterilized jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Remove any air bubbles and wipe rims. Add lids as each jar is filled. Process for 15 minutes in a water bath canner.
Enjoy!
Rule of thumb: My processing times are for altitudes of 1,000 or under. If you live in a higher altitude you will need to adjust the processing time accordingly. For processing times of 20 minutes or under, add one additional minute per each additional 1,000 feet of altitude. For processing times over 20 minutes add two additional minutes per each additional 1,000 feet of altitude. 

Note:  For more in depth instructions on water bath canning see my post on “Canning for Beginners” dated 12/12/11.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in this post are “affiliate links.” Please read my full Disclosure Policy.

By Miss Lady Bug

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<![CDATA[Homemade Fruit Leathers]]>Mon, 15 Jun 2015 22:08:02 GMThttp://missladybugsgarden.com/yes-you-can/homemade-fruit-leathers Homemade fruit leathers are delicious, chewy snacks made by drying puréed fruits. They are fun and easy to make.

Fruit leathers can be made with a single fruit or with different combinations of fruit. For an ultra nutitious treat, choose sweet fruits and avoid adding additional sweetners.
Raspberry Pear Roll-ups ~ Simply Delicious
Choose fruit that is nice and ripe. Wash fruit, and remove stems, peels, and large seeds. If you've selected berries, wash them in three parts water to one part vinegar.  

Chop fruit into pieces. Sprinkle lemon juice on fruit such as apples, peaches, pears, etc., to prevent darkening when the fruit is exposed to air.

Purée fruit in a blender or food processor. Taste fruit purée for sweetness, and add honey if necessary. Add spices to the purée if desired. Two cups of puréed fruit will cover an 11"x17" or 13"x15" baking pan.

Prepare your baking pan by using a professional baking mat. Spread the purée onto the mat evenly, approximately 1/8" thick, avoiding the edges.
Dry the purée in the oven at 170°F until done. This can take anywhere from four to eight hours depending on the fruit, and the oven. Use the convection setting on your oven, if you have it, to speed up the process. The raspberry pear leather pictured took five hours to dry (using the convection setting). The purée will dry from the outside edges toward the middle. To achieve an evenly dried leather, use a pastry brush to brush water on the edges as needed. If you're drying more than one leather at a time, rotate the pans in the oven.
Check for dryness by touching the middle of the leather. If there's no indentation or stickiness, and the leather easily peels from the baking mat, it's ready. While warm, remove the leather from the baking mat, and roll it up. When it cools, cut the leather into strips. Another option is to leave it flat and cut it into squares or shapes. You can roll individual strips in parchment paper, or wrap them in plastic, if desired. Fruit leathers should keep for months stored in an airtight container. They disappear within a week at my house. They are simply delicious!  
By Miss Lady Bug

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in this post are “affiliate links.” Please read my full Disclosure Policy.

Browncookie.com- Baking Supplies, Cake Pop Molds, Cookie Molds, Bilingual Cookbooks
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<![CDATA[Fruit Infused Vinegar]]>Tue, 19 May 2015 03:05:59 GMThttp://missladybugsgarden.com/yes-you-can/preserving-summer-fall-fruitPreserve summer and fall flavors in a bottle by infusing fruit in vinegar. Berries and stone fruits work the best, and make complex - sweet and tart vinegars.

This is a great way of preserving the delicious flavors of many fruits that are harvested throughout the whole season.
~ Blackberry and Raspberry Infused Vinegars ~
Fruit Infused Vinegar
Ingredients yield approx. one 16 ounce bottle

Ingredients:
  • 2 cups fresh berries (washed) or stone fruit (peeled)  per
  • 16 ounces white wine vinegar, high quality (5% acidity)
Directions:
  • Combine fruit and vinegar in sterilized jars. Cover tightly, and let steep for two (2) weeks in a cool, dark place. Strain mixture through cheesecloth or a fine mesh into a bowl, pressing down on the fruit to dispel all the juices.  Discard fruit.
  • Place non-metallic lids or plastic screw caps in a saucepan of warm water, heat to just below boiling and then remove from heat. Leave caps in the hot water until ready to use. If using corks, purchase pre-sterilized corks and dip them in boiling water before use.
  • Decant vinegar into sterilized bottles, and cover tightly. Date the bottles. Fruit infused vinegar can be stored up to three months in a cool, dry place. Refrigeration may extend the quality for up to six months. Add these healthy, flavorful vinegars to salads and marinades.

Note:  
If your infused vinegar starts to mold at any time, or show signs of fermentation such as bubbling, cloudiness, or sliminess, discard the product and do not use it.


If not handled properly, some harmful bacteria may survive and even multiply slowly in some vinegars. It is important to store infused vinegar in a cool place, or the refrigerator. Always work in a clean area using sanitary utensils.  Also be sure hands are clean while you work.


Enjoy your fruit infused vinegar!   

To make lovely gifts for family and friends, decant into pretty bottles.
~ Gift Worthy Berry Vinegars ~
By Miss Lady Bug
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<![CDATA[Homemade Pickling Spice]]>Tue, 14 Apr 2015 22:53:38 GMThttp://missladybugsgarden.com/yes-you-can/homemade-pickling-spice Spice it up with sweet and tangy goodness by keeping a jar of homemade pickling spice on hand. It not only adds flavor to pickled fruits and vegetables, it adds zest to braised meats, pot roasts, stews, and seafood.  

What's the advantage of homemade? You can adjust the combination of spices to please your palate. Try increasing the spices you find appealing.
Pickling Spice
Yields approximately 3/4 cup

Ingredients:

1 cinnamon stick, broken into pieces
5 dried bay leaves, crushed
2 tablespoons mustard seeds
1 tablespoon coriander seeds
1 tablespoon dill seeds
1 tablespoon whole peppercorns
2 teaspoons cardamom seeds
2 teaspoons whole allspice
1 teaspoon chili pepper flakes
1 teaspoon whole cloves

Directions:  

Combine all ingredients and store in an airtight container, at room temperature, for up to one year.

When using, leave the spices whole to avoid any cloudy residue. Add one to two tablespoons of pickling spice to each quart of liquid. Use a small muslin bag to easily remove and discard the spices.

Enjoy!
By Miss Lady Bug

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in this post are “affiliate links.” Please read my full Disclosure Policy.

Mountain Rose Herbs. A Herbs, Health & Harmony Com
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<![CDATA[Rumtopf - Preserving Fruit in Spirits]]>Tue, 17 Mar 2015 21:02:00 GMThttp://missladybugsgarden.com/yes-you-can/rumtopf-preserving-fruit-in-spiritsThe tradition in Germany of the rumtopf, or rum pot, is a method of preserving seasonal fruit in rum and sugar. The outcome is a fabulous dessert of rum soaked fruit, along with a warming, fruity cordial.
The process starts in late spring, when the first crop of fruit comes into season. Wash and dry the first chosen fruit, and remove any seeds, pits, or stems. Let the fruit macerate in half their volumn of sugar for at least an hour or overnight. If you have four cups of fruit, use two cups of sugar. This may seem like a lot of sugar, but it plays a major role in preservation and flavoring, so be sure to use the full amount. Add the fruit, sugar, and juices to your container. Cover the fruit by one inch with a good quality dark rum, 90  proof or above, to prevent fermentation. The fruit should be submerged. Store the container in a cool, dark place.
As more fruit comes into season, repeat the process with the fruit of your choice. Some fruits to avoid are bananas, melon, and citrus. Layer each fruit over the last layer without mixing, and add additional rum to cover by one inch. Continue the process throughout the summer and fall. When your container is full, let the rumptopf rest for six to eight weeks, topping off with additional rum as needed.  

The process goes much faster if you live in a region where fruit is available all year long. Just start layering!

Use the fruit in upside down cakes, ladled over ice cream and cheesecake, or as a garnish when serving the fruity cordials. The rumtopf juice is especially good in sparkling wine or champagne.

As you enjoy rumtopf, let yourself be reminded of all the sun-kissed fruit you were blessed with during the year!
By Miss Lady Bug
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<![CDATA[Homemade Spicy Mustard Recipe]]>Fri, 16 Jan 2015 03:23:53 GMThttp://missladybugsgarden.com/yes-you-can/homemade-spicy-mustardHave you ever tried making homemade mustard? Once you do, you will never buy it at the store again. It just doesn’t compare. I love spicy mustard and I wanted to share this recipe I developed. I've been making it for my family and friends.
Basic mustard is nothing more than mustard powder and water. What gives it a “bite” is the chemical reaction that happens when you mix the mustard seed/powder with a “cold” liquid (if you like mild mustard, then use a warm liquid). The trick is to mix in an acid, like vinegar, after the chemicals react, to lock in that fiery flavor.
~ Homemade Spicy Mustard ~
My recipe is a very simple process using mustard seed, mustard powder, a cold liquid, vinegar, and spices. For the cold liquid, I use stout beer, which adds a delicious malty flavor. I use brown and yellow mustard seeds, and keep mustard powder on hand in case I want to thicken it. Although, if it’s too thick for your taste, you just can add more vinegar.

This mustard will not deteriorate since it’s mixed with vinegar and salt. Refrigeration is not needed, but it you want to keep that fiery flavor, I would recommend it.  

TIP: Mustard seed is extremely expensive at the grocery store. Be a smart shopper and order your mustard seed (in bulk) online.

I hope you try this recipe and let me know how you like it.
Miss Lady Bug’s Dixie Mustard
Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup Ground Mustard  
  • 1/2 cup Mustard Seeds Whole (Brown) 
  • 1/2 Mustard Seeds Whole (Yellow) 
  • 1 1/2 cups (or 12 oz.) Stout Beer (or water) 
  • 1 1/2 cups Red Wine Vinegar (or cider vinegar) 
  • 2 tablespoons Brown Sugar 
  • 1 teaspoon Granulated Garlic 
  • 1 teaspoon Kosher Salt 
  • 1 teaspoon Black Pepper Freshly Ground 
  • 1/4 teaspoon Ground Ginger 
  • 1/4 teaspoon Turmeric 
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cinnamon
Directions:

  • Whisk together ground mustard, mustard seeds and COLD beer in a bowl and set it aside for ten minutes (creates a chemical reaction).
  • Add vinegar (locks in fiery flavor), sugar, and spices. Whisk.  
  • Let sit for 24-48 hrs, covered.
  • Blend in food processor (or blender to break up softened seeds). 
  • Adjust thickness with mustard powder if desired.
  • Add to sterilized jars. 
  • Refrigerate to preserve spiciness.
I double this recipe to yield approximately four pints. Delicious! Enjoy.
By Miss Lady Bug
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<![CDATA[Spiced Honey-Glazed Orange Slices Recipe]]>Sun, 09 Nov 2014 21:21:54 GMThttp://missladybugsgarden.com/yes-you-can/spiced-honeyglazed-orange-slices-recipeOrange slices, glazed with spiced honey are delicious served over ice cream, yogurt, and pound cake. The rinds, which are also edible, soften over time and absorb the spiced syrup.

Use the syrup to sweeten beverages, or make a tasty glaze for pork, chicken, and shrimp.
Spiced Honey-Glazed Orange Slices
Yields approximately 2 pints

Ingredients:

2 cinnamon sticks (approximately 4" long)
1 1/2 teaspoons allspice, whole
1 1/2 teaspoons cloves, whole
1/2 teaspoon peppercorns, whole
2 1/2 pounds oranges (approximately 4 large)
1 1/4 cups orange blossom honey
1 1/4 cups sugar
3 tablespoons lemon juice 
Directions:

Prepare a spice bag with a square of cheesecloth or a muslin bag, and the spices. Set aside.

Cut oranges in half lengthwise, and slice thin. Remove the seeds.

In a large stainless steel pan, add the oranges and cover with water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and gently boil for 15 minutes to tenderize the peel. Remove from heat, drain, and set aside.

Rinse the large stainless steel pan and reuse to combine the honey, sugar, and lemon juice. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly, then reduce heat and simmer until the sugar is dissolved. Add the spice bag and the oranges. Gently boil for 40 minutes to glaze the oranges. Remove from heat, discard the spice bag, and set aside for 5 minutes.

Pack the orange slices into sterilized jars leaving just under ½" headspace. Add a bit of spices to the jars, if desired. Ladle the hot syrup into the jars leaving ½" headspace. Remove air bubbles and wipe rims. Add lids as each jar is filled. Process in a water bath canner for 10 minutes.

Delicious!
Rule of thumb: My processing times are for altitudes of 1,000 or under. If you live in a higher altitude you will need to adjust the processing time accordingly. For processing times of 20 minutes or under, add one additional minute per each additional 1,000 feet of altitude. For processing times over 20 minutes add two additional minutes per each additional 1,000 feet of altitude. 
Note:  For more in depth instructions on water bath canning see my post on “Canning for Beginners” dated 12/12/11.
By Miss Lady Bug
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<![CDATA[Sweet Pumpkin Pickles Recipe]]>Sun, 12 Oct 2014 18:04:20 GMThttp://missladybugsgarden.com/yes-you-can/sweet-pumpkin-pickles-recipe Pumpkin pickles are sweet, warmly spiced, and have a beautiful golden-orange color. They make a lovely addition to the dinner table.

They are also gift worthy, so you may want to reserve a jar for someone special.
Sweet Pumpin Pickles
Yields approximately 6 pints

Ingredients:

3 teaspoons pickling spice
1 lemon
6 cups granulated sugar
4 cups apple cider vinegar
24 cups pie pumpkin, seeded, peeled, cubed

Directions:

Prepare a spice bag with a square of cheesecloth or a muslin bag, and add the pickling spice. Set aside.

Zest lemon, set aside. Remove white pith and membrane from lemon, and discard. Chop segments, and set aside.

In a large stainless steel pan, combine lemon zest, pulp, sugar, vinegar, and spice bag. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and cover. Gently boil for ten minutes. Add pumpkin, return to a boil, and cook for three minutes. Discard the spice bag, and set aside for 5 minutes.

Pack the pumpkin into sterilized jars leaving just under ½" headspace. Add pickling spice to the jars, if desired. Ladle the hot syrup into the jars leaving ½" headspace. Remove air bubbles and wipe rims. Add lids as each jar is filled. Process in a water bath canner for 20 minutes.

Simply delicious!

Check out my recipe for the perfect Roasted Pumpkin Seeds.
Rule of thumb: My processing times are for altitudes of 1,000 or under. If you live in a higher altitude you will need to adjust the processing time accordingly. For processing times of 20 minutes or under, add one additional minute per each additional 1,000 feet of altitude. For processing times over 20 minutes add two additional minutes per each additional 1,000 feet of altitude.

Note: For more in depth instructions on water bath canning see my post on “Canning for Beginners” dated 12/12/11.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in this post are “affiliate links.” Please read my full Disclosure Policy.

By Miss Lady Bug
www.FlirtyAprons.com
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<![CDATA[Old-Fashioned Cherry Chutney Recipe]]>Mon, 22 Sep 2014 22:02:38 GMThttp://missladybugsgarden.com/yes-you-can/old-fashioned-cherry-chutney-recipeCapture the rich flavor of sweet cherries with this old-fashioned chutney. With a combination of cherries, apples, onions, sugar, and spices, this chutney pairs wonderfully with roasted meats. It's also delicious on homemade biscuits.
Old-Fashioned Cherry Chutney
Yields approximately six 8 ounce jars

Ingredients:

4 ½ teaspoons whole allspice
1 cinnamon stick, broken
10 cups frozen sweet black cherries, partially thawed, coarsely chopped
2 tart apples, peeled, cored, chopped
1 ½ cups red onion, finely chopped
1 cup white vinegar (5% acidity)
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
½ teaspoon salt
1 cup brown sugar
1 ½ cups raisins

Directions:

Prepare a spice bag with a square of cheesecloth and the allspice and cinnamon.  

In a large stainless steel pan, combine the cherries, apples, onions, vinegar, garlic, salt, and spice bag. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and boil for twenty minutes while continually stirring (you may need to lower the heat as the moisture evaporates to prevent scorching). Add the brown sugar. Reduce heat and simmer while continuing to stir until the mixture thickens, approximately twenty minutes. Add the raisins and return to a boil. Remove the mixture from heat and discard the spice bag.

Ladle the hot chutney into hot sterilized jars leaving ½ inch head space. Remove air bubbles and wipe rims. Add lids as each jar is filled. Process in a water bath canner for 10 minutes.

Tip: Let the chutney flavors blend for about two weeks before enjoying. Delicious!
Rule of thumb: My processing times are for altitudes of 1,000 or under. If you live in a higher altitude you will need to adjust the processing time accordingly. For processing times of 20 minutes or under, add one additional minute per each additional 1,000 feet of altitude. For processing times over 20 minutes add two additional minutes per each additional 1,000 feet of altitude. 

Note:  For more in depth instructions on water bath canning see my post on “Canning for Beginners” dated 12/12/11.
By Miss Lady Bug
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<![CDATA[Homemade Pineapple Jam Recipe]]>Sat, 23 Aug 2014 17:17:52 GMThttp://missladybugsgarden.com/yes-you-can/homemade-pineapple-jam-recipe Serve up some hospitality with homemade pineapple jam. Welcome your family and friends by serving this delicious jam on biscuits, toast, ice cream, or pound cake. 

With it’s vibrant tropical flavor, it’s sure to be a favorite.
Miss Lady Bug's Pineapple Jam
Yields approximately four 8 ounce jars 

Ingredients:

4 cups pineapple, finely chopped, peeled, cored (1 large pineapple)
2 1/2 cups sugar
1 lime (unpeeled), seeded, thinly sliced
1 cup water
2 tablespoons butter

Variation: Substitute 1/4 cup of of sugar with finely ground, gourmet hibiscus sugar to obtain a beautiful pink hue (pictured). See my post on Bloomin' Good Gourmet Sugar.

Directions:

Place pineapple, sugar, lime, and water in a large stainless steel pot on the stove. Stir over low heat until the sugar is dissolved. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Add butter to minimize foaming. Continue to boil over medium heat, stirring frequently, for approximately 30 minutes to get the desired thickness. You can check thickness by placing a spoonful of jam on a previously chilled plate and put in the freezer for one minute. Remove the plate and push the edge of the jam with your finger. If it has reached the gel stage it will be set, and the surface will wrinkle when the edge is pushed. 

Pack into hot sterilized jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Remove any air bubbles and wipe rims. Add lids as each jar is filled. Process for 10 minutes in a water bath canner.

Enjoy!
Rule of thumb: My processing times are for altitudes of 1,000 or under. If you live in a higher altitude you will need to adjust the processing time accordingly. For processing times of 20 minutes or under, add one additional minute per each additional 1,000 feet of altitude. For processing times over 20 minutes add two additional minutes per each additional 1,000 feet of altitude. 

Note:  For more in depth instructions on water bath canning see my post on “Canning for Beginners” dated 12/12/11.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in this post are “affiliate links.” Please read my full Disclosure Policy.
By Miss Lady Bug
Online Food Craft Class
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